Super Foods

Kale
If Popeye knew about kale, he’d never have bothered with spinach. This robust, dark leafy green is chock-full of nutrients like iron, vitamins A, C and K, fiber, antioxidants and is a great detoxifier (particularly for your liver).

Chia seeds
Prized by the Mayans and Aztecs, this superfood is once again becoming a star in the modern-day diet. Add these to your diet to get a boost of fiber, omega fatty acids, calcium — and it’s also a complete protein that’s easy to add to salads and smoothies.

Spinach
Your mother always told you to eat this vibrant, leafy green if you want to grow up big and strong. What she didn’t mention is that it’s also great for preventing prostate cancer, is an excellent source of vitamins A, C and K, is loaded with antioxidants and is a good source of protein.

Swiss chard
Swiss chard grades highly among the ranks of nutrient-packed leafy greens, but the best part might be the taste. Kale can be tough, collards are heavy and some people hate spinach, Swiss chard tastes similar to the very neutral romaine lettuce. Best of all, it has all of the same nutrients as its brethren.

Collard greens
Collard greens don’t get the type of love that kale does, but they still bring the same nutrients to the table, like vitamins C and K. Collards also give you vitamin E, folate and manganese, and similarly, are known as a cancer-fighter.

Bee pollen
Bee pollen is an incredible superfood that is considered to be one of the most complete foods you can eat. It is a richer source of protein than any animal source (percentage-wise) and it contains all of the essential amino acids as well. Throw in massive amount of enzymes (over 5,000), phytonutrients, vitamins (A, B, C and E), and a ton of minerals, and you’ll be giving your body a big boost. Some of those benefits include increased energy, muscle growth, and a stronger immune system.

Blueberries
Blueberries are great for the brain, as they help improve your memory, as well as prevent the onset of any cognitive problems that tend to come with age. The best part is that this popular fruit is commonly available in the frozen section, and most of its important antioxidants are preserved even through freezing.

Turmeric
Turmeric powder is a spice that’s often found in curries that has plenty of health benefits. It’s not only known for its yellow pigment; it also helps combat free radicals, is great for inflammation and protects against memory loss. Although it’s better recognized in its powder form, nowadays, a number of markets will carry the turmeric root as well, which looks very similar to ginger root.

Garlic
Sure, it’ll make your breath stink, but otherwise, it’s worth it. This age-old superfood is renowned for giving your immune system a boost and warding off many types of cancer.

Acai
This tiny purple berry is packed with antioxidants that’ll help fend off cancer, heart disease and even aging. It’s one of the rare fruits that contains oleic acid, which is the same healthy fat that’s found in olive oil, and even has the ideal essential amino acid complex, which is integral to muscle regeneration.

Lingonberries
Meet one of the newest berry superfoods on the block: lingonberries. They’re loaded with plant polyphenols, which means these tart little red berries contribute in a number of fashions. They can lower inflammation, fight staph infections, replace antioxidants, add red blood cells and increase liver enzymes.

Beets
Beets can be messy to work with, but those who go through pain get the gain at the end. Beets are a unique source of betalains, which is a phytonutrient that can combat tumors. Make sure you don’t throw away the beet greens, as they are high in lutein, which is related to and has similar benefits as vitamin A.

Black beans
Black beans make this list because they’re a very underrated source of protein. One cup provides around 15 grams of protein, and the best part is that you don’t have to deal with any of the saturated fats that you might get from animal protein sources, like red meat.

Oats
Oats might seem like a boring breakfast option, but they’re a great choice for those who need to lower their cholesterol. Whole grain oats help do exactly that, and help with the maintenance of your blood-sugar levels. Just add some blueberries, cinnamon or honey to liven up the oats.

Avocados
Avocado is another one of those paradoxical high-fat foods that’s still good for your body. That’s because it contains good fats, as well as oleic acid, lutein, folate, vitamin E and glutathione. All of those assist in deflecting heart disease and cancer.

Walnuts
Boost your mood by adding more walnuts to your diet. Not only do these guys have a healthy amount of zinc, manganese and copper, they’re also loaded with serotonin, which is a chemical in our brain directly tied to happiness and feeling good. As a matter of fact, walnuts have among the highest values of serotonin you can find.

Almonds
Almonds are one of the most popular superfoods on this list that most people already consume. What could possibly be bad about a high-fat food that’s good for your heart? These guys are loaded with good fats which promote heart health and lower bad cholesterol. Almonds are also a quality source of manganese, vitamin E, magnesium and tryptophan.

Quinoa
Vegetarians and vegans have been up on quinoa for years, but now everyone else is catching up. It offers a great source of non-animal protein with about eight grams in one cup. It’s also a good source of fiber and iron.

Pistachios
Looking to lower your cholesterol? Here’s one option that’s not in pill form: pistachios. They’re stocked with phytosterols and soluble fiber, both of which have been shown to lower LDL (bad cholesterol).

Red peppers
Red bell peppers often get overlooked as a superfood, but they’re loaded in their own right. There’s more than three times the daily recommended vitamin C intake per pepper, plus vitamin A, antioxidants and lycopene, which reduces the risk of prostate cancer.

Papaya
If you’re feeling the onset of a cold, reach for this tropical fruit instead of an orange next time. One papaya has more than three times the daily recommended intake of vitamin C and is also stocked with flavonoids, vitamin B, potassium, magnesium and fiber. All in all, it’s good for the cardiovascular system and reduces the risk of colon cancer.

Flax seeds
Small in size but large in returns, flax seeds are easy to add to salads, cereals and soups. They are best known for being a good source of fiber, which helps keep your exits smooth. But they’re also a good source for omega-3 fatty acid and lignans, which reduce breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men.

Wheatgrass
While the taste is sometimes hard to swallow, the juice extracted from wheatgrass has wonderful effects on the body. It does everything — stimulating the thyroid, boosting the red blood cell count, detoxifying the blood and gastrointestinal tract, fending off cancer and providing beneficial enzymes to the body.

The Strange Life of Mollie Fancher

Mary Jane “Mollie” Fancher was just a pleasantly average girl in Brooklyn, New York. She had some troubles early in life, but nothing that most people didn’t face in those days.

Born in 1848, her mother died when she was seven, and her father remarried and virtually disappeared from her life. She and her two surviving siblings were raised by an unmarried aunt, Susan Crosby.

Fancher grew up bright and well-liked, and appeared quite normal until 1864, when she developed some vague, not-unusual complaints, “nervous indigestion,” lack of appetite, and general weakness. Physicians prescribed a regime of horseback riding as the best way of “bringing her out of herself.” It indeed set her on the road to doing just that, but in ways no one imagined. This seemingly innocent doctor’s order was her first step into becoming what would later be called “The Brooklyn Enigma.” Even if the more astounding stories about her are taken with some skepticism, she still remained striking proof that we human beings are far more complex and mysterious creatures than we usually realize.

Fancher’s long, strange journey began on May 19, 1864, when she was thrown from her horse. She suffered a few broken bones and head injuries, but she gradually recovered. She even accepted a proposal of marriage. However, her convalescence was scarcely over before she was even more badly hurt in a horrific accident where her skirt became caught on a streetcar and was dragged over the pavement for nearly a block. She suffered head and spinal injuries, and it seemed at first that this second incident was too much for the girl.

On February 3, 1866, Fancher, who had been bedridden since her accident, slipped into the first of what would prove to be a lifetime of recurring trance states. From that time until her death, she was bedridden, often blind and utterly paralyzed. She scarcely, if ever, ate or drank. Her baffled doctors could do nothing for her except try to make her tormented existence as bearable as possible.

Mollie Fancher 1887

In June of 1866, her doctor, Robert Spier, arrived to do a routine examination. Before leaving, he said smilingly, “I always remain here longer than I intend. I was to be home today at one o’clock to my dinner. We are having chicken pot pie, and you know it is never good when cold.”

The next day, Fancher fell into a lengthy trance state. Her right hand was frozen in an awkward position behind her head. Her entire body was largely paralyzed and in chronic, agonizing pain.

Here is where Fancher’s story goes from tragic to incredible. This paralyzed, bedridden, pain-wracked, seemingly broken woman became a whirlwind of activity. She wrote thousands of letters, kept a diary, created numerous beautiful yarn works and wax flowers, all talents she did not have before her illness, and from her little bedroom which she would never leave again, carried on a busy social life.

This went on for nine years, until she went into another mysterious coma. When she awoke, the first face she saw was that of Dr. Spier’s brother. She asked him if his sibling made it home in time to get his chicken pie. Then, she realized that everyone around her suddenly looked much older.

Her mind had reverted to the “old Mollie.” She had no memory of the past nine years. When shown her letters and yarn work, she thought, “They were the work of one who was dead.”

She began exhibiting varied psychic abilities. For unknown reasons, she quickly went blind, only to discover that she could “see” anyway. She could not explain it other than to say that it was like she could somehow “see” through her forehead. She also displayed clairvoyant powers, predicting events in the future. She began to practice “astral projection,” where her mind could travel at will and observe events hundreds of miles away. On at least one occasion, this “wild talent,” as Charles Fort would call it, plunged her into horror. One day, she suddenly screamed, “My God, he is dead!” She was helplessly watching her brother dying in a train accident.

Fancher’s other peculiar abilities were carefully recorded. It was said that in complete darkness, she could correctly distinguish colors. She could find objects people had mislaid. She knew when thunderstorms were approaching, many hours before they arrived. She read letters and books merely by running her hands over them. When her front bell rang, she knew who was there before anyone even answered the door.

All this turned her into America’s most famous invalid. She was visited by a steady stream of doctors, scientists, poets, authors, academics, and clergymen, all anxious to solve the riddle of someone who was so helpless, yet so strangely gifted.

A noted astronomer named Henry Parkhurst had all the doubts a rational man of science would feel about the stories of Fancher’s odd powers. He did a number of experiments designed to show whether the young woman was a cynical hoaxer, a hysterical invalid, or something else altogether. At the end of his tests, he still could not understand her, but he was convinced her paranormal abilities were genuine.

One day in 1887, Fancher fell from her bed, causing yet another head injury. Several days later, a friend was sitting with her when she fell into one of her sudden, inexplicable trances. When she awoke a few minutes later, she gave the man a puzzled look. “Who are you?” she asked in a voice that wasn’t Mollie Fancher’s.

She had developed split personalities. Five of them. Everyone around her was introduced to “Idol,” an aggressive type, “Rosebud,” a sweet six-year-old, “Pearl,” an ethereal, elegant lady who wrote poetry, “Ruby,” a wisecracking, rambunctious tomboy, and “Sunbeam,” who seems to have been an extension of Mollie’s original self.

By the 1890s, Fancher’s physical condition improved somewhat. She regained some of her sight, she was able to move her arms and upper body, and she ate and drank almost normally. Curiously, her relative return to health saw a corresponding decrease in her psychic abilities. 

Mollie Fancher just prior to her death

Mollie Fancher just prior to her death

In a newspaper interview that appeared in the “New York World,” on November 12, 1915, she gave her own rationale for her long and unusually unfortunate existence, suggesting that “there must be some hidden purpose in keeping me alive and that maybe it is just to show thousands of suffering men and women that the human soul is greater than the body and can triumph over any illness or pain the body may have to endure.”  Despite her near-lifetime as a recluse, she still took a great deal of interest in the outside world.  She displayed a rather wistful interest in contemporary ladies’ fashions and expressed her disgust for automobiles and the Kaiser.  She was also a supporter of women’s suffrage.  “I pay taxes on this house and I ought to vote,” she would say.

Fancher continued in her strange little world until on February 3, 1916, she reached the fiftieth anniversary of her first trance state, which she wryly called her “Golden Jubilee.” The “Brooklyn Enigma” died eight days later.

The Devil’s Bible

Codex Gigas, otherwise known as ‘the Devil’s Bible’ is the largest and probably one of the strangest manuscripts in the world.  It is so large that it is said to have taken more than 160 animal skins to make it and takes at least two people to lift it.  It measures approximately 1 metre in length.

According to legend, the medieval manuscript was made out of a pact with the ‘devil’, which is why it is sometimes referred to as the Devil’s Bible. It was written in Latin during the 13th century AD, and although the origin of the manuscript is unknown, a note in the manuscript states that it was pawned in the monastery at Sedlec in 1295.

codex-gigas2The story behind the making of Codex Gigas (“the giant codex”) is that it was the work of one monk who was sentenced to death by being walled up alive. Indeed, an analysis on the text does suggest that it was written by just one scribe due to the level of uniformity throughout.  The legend says that the monk produced the manuscript in just one night… with the devil’s help. However, it is not known where this legend started and it is suspected that it was religiously propagated.

Stories and legends say that the Codex Gigas brought disaster or illness on whoever possessed it during its history.  Fortunately, the National Library in Stockholm, where it is currently housed, appears immune to the curse of the codex!

Codex Gigas contains a complete vulgate Latin translation of the Bible as well as five other major texts. It begins with the Old Testament and continues with ‘Antiquities of the Jews’ by Flavius Josephus (1st century AD; ‘Encyclopedia Etymologiae’ by Isidore of Seville (6th century AD); a collection of medical works of Hippocrates, Theophilus and others; the New Testament; and ‘The Chronicle of Bohemia’ by Cosmas of Prague (1050 AD).

Smaller texts are also included in the manuscript with the most famous ones including: text on exorcism, magic formulas, a picture of the Heavenly City, and a full page illustration of the Devil.  The illustration is the reason why legend says the codex was written with the devil’s help. 

According to the National Geographic, it would take one person working continuously, day and night, for five years to recreate the contents of Codex Gigas by hand (excluding the illustrations). Therefore, realistically it would have taken at least 25 years for the scribe to create the codex from scratch. Yet, all this time, the writing retained an incredible uniformity from start to finish. This may be the source of the legend which says that the monk wrote it in just one day.

The manuscript is currently displayed at the National Library in Stockholm where you can also view the digital pages of the Codex.

40 Uses For Coca-Cola

The list

1. Remove grease stains from clothing and fabric (I had to start there)

2. Remove rust; methods include using fabric dipped in Coke, a sponge or even aluminum foil. 

3. Remove blood stains from clothing and fabric.

4. Kill slugs and snails; a small bowl of Coke will attract them, the acid will kill them.

5. Clean oil stains from a garage floor; let the stain soak, hose off.

6. Loosen a rusty bolt; pour on some Coke and wait for the magic to happen.

7. Prevent an asthma attack! Apparently, the caffeine in two 12oz cans can prevent the onset of an attack.

8. Defrost a frozen windshield. Apply liberally and wait.

9. Cure nausea; let a can of Coke go flat then take a teaspoon of Coke every hour.

10. Also, flat coke can help relieve an upset stomach
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11. Add it to a Sloppy Joe mix
12. Clean burnt pans; let the pan soak in the Coke, then rinse.

13. Descale a kettle using the same method in 12.

14. Neutralize a jellyfish sting.

15. Clean car battery terminals by pouring a small amount of Coke over each one.

16. Get rid of hiccups; gargle with a big mouthful of ice-cold Coke.

17. Make better compost; Coke increases the acidity, adds sugars and feeds microorganisms.

18. Shake up a can and pour it over your windshield to remove bugs and other crud.

19. Use the method in 18 for your car bumpers, too. 

20. Clean your engine; Coke distributors have been using this technique for decades. 

21. Relieve congestion; boil and a can of Coke and drink while hot to clear you up.

22. Make a sweet BBQ sauce. Mix a can of Coke with ketchup and brush over ribs or chicken.

23. Baste a ham roast with Coke as it cooks. The sugars will caramelize; the ham will be moist.
24. Add a can of coke to your pot roast to tenderize it and add extra flavor. (Thanks Linsey).

25. Make pretty pennies; soaking old pennies in Coke will remove the tarnish. 

26. Make your hair curly; pour flat Coke onto long hair, leave for a few minutes then rinse.

27. Age documents and photos; for that antique look, apply Coke, pat with paper, leave to dry. 

28. Clean tile grout; pour onto kitchen floor, leave for a few minutes, wipe up.

29. Mix a can of Coke with a packet of Italian seasoning; cook a tough steak in it.

30. Get silky skin; mix a spoonful of Coke with regular lotion and apply liberally.

31. Remove gum from hair; dip into a small bowl of Coke, leave a few minutes. Gum will wipe off.

32. Remove (or fade) dye from hair by pouring diet Coke over it.

33. Add Coke to your laundry to remove bad smells, especially fish.

34. Pour a little in a cup and set it out an hour before a picnic, away from your site; it will attract wasps and bees so they’re not bugging you and your grub. 

35. Remove stains from vitreous china. 

36. Got a dirty pool? Add two 2-liter bottles of Coke to clear up the water (it acts as rust remover). 

37. Coke and aluminum foil will bring Chrome to a high shine.

38. Perk up your Azaleas or Gardenias.

39. Remove marker stains from carpet. Apply Coke, scrub, then clean with soapy water. 

40. Clean a toilet; pour around bowl, leave for a while, flush clean.