Mormon Magic Underwear For the Masses

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The company was founded by a formon (former Mormon) named Ann Jackson who was married as a teenager and has since divorced and left the faith — she’ll sell “temple garments” (AKA “magic Mormon underwear”) to anyone who wants ‘em, and promises that none of the profits go to the LDS.

Mormon’s Secret is the first and only site in the world selling real Mormon underwear (temple garments) to all adults, regardless of their religious affiliation.  For the first time in history, online shoppers can purchase these magical temple garments without first joining the Mormon church and giving up 10% of their income in tithes. Our goal is to make “magical” underwear available to the masses for use as costume wear, fetish wear, and all your kinky, dress-up needs.
 
WHAT MAKES YOUR UNDERWEAR REAL?
All of our garments follow the authentic Mormon patterns, heirloom stitching techniques, and traditional Masonic symbols hand-sewn on each garment. The underwear are available in both tops and bottoms, and come in both cotton and mesh fabrics for men, as well as a spanx-like cotton-spandex blend for women. Surprisingly, there is no such thing as kosher Mormon underwear. None of the religious groups that make and distribute temple garments go through a consecration or blessing process. The Mormon Church’s secret for making magic underwear is part pattern and part recipe. So to sum it up, our Mormon underwear are as magical as you can get! Our garments even come packaged with a satirical yet accurate description of the actual Mormon underwear initiation ritual that includes nudity, biblical references, and magical expectations.
 

Artist Draws Detailed Pictures From Memory

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Dutch artist Stefan Bleekrode has been blessed with the most amazing talent – he can draw amazingly detailed sketches of cities he has visited, using only his razor-sharp memory as reference .

The 28-year-old has used his superhuman power of recollection to create ‘Cityscapes’, a series of sketches of some of the world’s most famous cities, like London, New York and Paris. Stefan’s drawings are so mindbogglingly detailed that it’s almost impossible to believe he relies solely on his memory. Using just ink, he composes dense and realistic images of buildings, streets, lights, bridges and any other details his mind picks up. His sophisticated techniques – stark tonal contrasts, precise perspective, and stunning detail – make each drawing look photographic, as if they were captured from an aerial vantage point.

The Slave Who Helped End the Revolutionary War

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It is uncertain of when James Armistead was born—his birth year has been variously reported as 1748 or 1760—but we know he was born on William Armistead’s plantation in New Kent County, Virginia. By December 1780, the Revolutionary War had been raging for five years and England was finding it hard to occupy territory as expansive as the American colonies. While George Washington and his army had few victories, it remained a viable fighting force despite the superior might of the redcoats. And, in 1777, the colonials captured an entire British force at Saratoga, New York. Impressed with this achievement, the French agreed to fight side-by-side with the Americans.

Frustrated, the Brits changed their strategy. They invaded the southern states, hoping to divide the colonies in two. Initially, General Cornwallis’ campaign had success. But he found it difficult to supply his army in the southern wilderness, especially when the colonials began using guerrilla tactics against his supply trains. Facing failure, Cornwallis began marching north through the Carolinas.

Meanwhile, the colonials had their own setback: General Benedict Arnold, the hero of Saratoga, betrayed his country and joined the British in September 1780. His first mission for his new command was to invade Virginia in order to stop supplies on their way to the southern colonies.

Washington got wind of the invasion and warned Virginia governor Thomas Jefferson. But Jefferson ignored the warning until Arnold’s ships appeared off the southern tip of the Virginia Peninsula on December 30, 1780. By then it was too late, and Arnold sailed up the James River and entered Richmond unopposed. He then burned it.

Washington sent General Marquis de Lafayette to stop Arnold, but by the time he arrived, Arnold had encamped at Portsmouth in a strong, defensible position. While Lafayette waited for an opportunity, he enlisted spies to infiltrate Arnold’s camp.

James Armistead no doubt knew the British were emancipating slaves who fought for them, but he told his master he wanted to carry a musket for Virginia in the colonial army. However, when he appeared at Lafayette’s camp, the French general had other ideas. Armistead knew the area and Lafayette wanted the slave to pose as a runaway and offer his services as a scout to Arnold.

Armistead succeeded beyond expectations: Arnold was so convinced of Armistead’s loyalty to the crown, he was entrusted with guiding redcoat detachments through the countryside. And he was given the freedom to roam the British camps where he listened to officers as they talked around the fires.

Armistead even set up a network of other African Americans who delivered his reports to Lafayette. To gain Arnold’s confidence, Armistead told him he had spies in Lafayette’s camp, and began providing intelligence to Arnold of colonial plans, all of it false.

In May 1781, Cornwallis arrived in Virginia and took command, sending Arnold to New York. Armistead stayed with Cornwallis, continuing his duties. In July, the young slave sent Lafayette word that Cornwallis was moving down the Peninsula to Yorktown to await reinforcements and supplies. Washington was about to attack the Brits at New York when he received Armistead’s intelligence. He quickly changed his plans.

Together with Lafayette and a French fleet, Washington surrounded Cornwallis, who surrendered his army in October 1781. The Brits would never again be able launch an offensive, and two years later they officially relinquished their claims to the colonies.

Slaves who served in the colonial army were, after the war, given their freedom. But because he was a spy, not a soldier, Armistead was returned to his master. In 1787, with the help of Lafayette, Armistead petitioned the Virginia government and was legally emancipated. Grateful, he took Lafayette’s surname as his own.

Armistead purchased 40 acres of his own in Kent County, married, and even owned slaves of his own. And he was given a $40-a-month pension for his wartime services beginning in 1819. He died in 1832.

Types of Coffee

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Affogato: This is a term that literally means ‘drowned’. It is the description of a shot of separately served espresso that is later poured over a the top of a scoop of vanilla ice cream or gelato. This beverage is usually served in a short drink glass and is a Italian desert favourite. Popular Affogatos include Vanilla Affogato, Mocha Affogato, and Peppermint Affogato.

Americano: Also known as “Lungo” or “Long Black” and made by diluting 1-2 shots of espresso with hot water in order to approximate the texture, flavor and body of an American-style drip coffee. Said to have been originally devised as a sort of insult to Americans who wanted their Italian espresso diluted.

Babycino: A cappuccino styled drink served in an up-market café typically for children. It consists of warm milk in a small cup and topped with milk froth and chocolate powder. No espresso coffee essence is added.

Breve: A term in Italian that means short and is used to describe an espresso coffee drink made with a half-and-half light cream or semi-skim milk instead of full fat milk

Caffe’ Freddo: Chilled, sweetened espresso served in a tall glass, often on ice.

Caffe Latte or “Latte”: A ‘premium milk coffee experience’. Freshly steamed milk without foam served in a tall glass with a shot of espresso coffee.

Caffe Mocha: A combination of chocolate syrup and a shot of espresso, topped with steamed milk and a layer of micro-foam. Finished with a sprinkled of chocolate.

Cappuccino Chiaro: (AKA Wet or Light cappuccino): Cappuccino prepared with more milk than usual.

Cappuccino Scuro: (AKA Dry or Dark cappuccino) Cappuccino prepared with less milk than usual.

Cappuccino: “Cap”: A ‘traditional morning heart starter’. Steamed foamed velvety milk poured over one shot (1) of coffee oil extract made from 12gm of freshly ground beans producing 38ml of essence. Finished by topping with foam and a sprinkle of chocolate powder. Served in a pre heated vitrified ceramic cup.

Con panna: Like the beverage “macchiato”, but whipped cream is substituted for steamed milk.
Cortado: means “cut” in Spanish so the double shot espresso served in a demetesse glass supported with a metal handle is “cut” with an equal part of hot milk, making it in between the size and strength of a macchiato and a cappuccino. It is popular in Spain and Portugal, as well as throughout Latin America and Cuba, where it is drunk in the afternoon. Variations include more froth on top than a traditional cortado and occasionally with different names such as

Piccolo or Gibraltar. Thanks to Ryan Cerbus for the entry.
Corretto: Espresso “corrected” with a touch of grappa, cognac, sambuca, or other spirit.

Doppio: Italian term for double. Double Espresso or twice the amount of coffee and twice the amount of water. Basically it describes two shots of espresso in one demitasse container.

Espresso con Panna: A variation of the macchiato by substituting a dollop of whipped cream for the milk froth. Basically a Starbucks invention. Means in Italian “espresso with cream”.

Espresso Lungo: American term where a shot is extracted longer for a bit of extra espresso. Tends to maximizes the caffeine but will mostly produce a more bitter cup.

Espresso Romano: Espresso served with a lemon peel on the side. Whilst not a typical accompaniment in Italy it is commonly served with the espresso beverage in America.

Flat White: “White Coffee” – ‘uncompromising taste’.Steamed microfroam milk poured through and under the espresso crème produced from one shot (1) of coffee extract made on 12gm of freshly ground coffee producing 38ml of essence. Served in a pre heated vitrified ceramic cup. A common espresso coffee order in Australia/New Zealand. Great for latte art!

Hammerhead: A coffee drink only served in the USA. It is an American term for a shot of espresso in a coffee cup that is topped up with drip-filtered coffee. As Kris Rosvold explains in the comments: In Oregon, the hammerhead is usually known as a red eye and uses 2 shots of espresso topped up in a 16oz travel mug with drip coffee.

Irish Coffee: Coffee mixed with a dash of Irish whiskey and served with cream on top.

Latte Macchiato: Steamed milk served in a tall glass rather than a cup that is “stained” by a shot of espresso coffee.

Long Black: Often called the “American”. It is the ‘benchmark coffee without milk’. It is pure coffee made from one & one half shots of coffee extract made on 16gm of fresh ground beans producing 50ml of essence blended with steamed water. Served in a pre heated vitrified ceramic cup with the essence floated over the top of a cup filled with hot/boiling water. It is a standard espresso (Short Black) but lengthened by the addition of hot/boiling water.

Lungo: An espresso made by purposely allowing more water to flow through the ground coffee than usual. (sometimes called an Americano or ‘long’).

Macchiato: Meaning “stained” – Described as ‘strong, marked or stained’. A touch of steamed foamed milk added to a double shot of coffee extract made from 24gm of fresh ground beans producing 75ml of essence. Served in glass.

Mazagran: A French drink composed of cold coffee and seltzer water. First created by the French soldiers in 1840 in the town of Argelia. A variation includes iced coffee made with maraschino.

Quad: An espresso drink made with four shots of coffee.

Ristretto: (Ristretto in Italian means “restricted, shrunk or short”) It is the richest and most concentrated espresso drink where less water but the same amount of coffee is used to make the beverage and creates a less bitter espresso. The extraction time is shortened producing as little as 3 oz of liquid per serving. Pure and intense espresso served in a demitasse cup.

Short Black: A ‘pure intense Italian favourite with a biting crème head. Contains 75ml of pure double shot coffee essence made from 24gm of fresh ground coffee beans. Traditionally served in glass and is referred to as Espresso by European customers.

Viennese Coffee: Brewed black coffee of any roast or origin topped and served with whipped cream.

Incredible Coincidences

15. Childhood Book
While American novelist Anne Parrish was browsing bookstores in Paris in the 1920s, she came upon a book that was one of her childhood favorites – Jack Frost and Other Stories. She picked up the old book and showed it to her husband, telling him of the book she fondly remembered as a child. Her husband took the book, opened it, and on the flyleaf found the inscription: “Anne Parrish, 209 N. Weber Street, Colorado Springs.” It was Anne’s very own book.

14. Poker Luck
In 1858, Robert Fallon was shot dead, an act of vengeance by those with whom he was playing poker. Fallon, they claimed, had won the $600 pot through cheating. With Fallon’s seat empty and none of the other players willing to take the now unlucky $600, they found a new player to take Fallon’s place and staked him with the dead man’s $600. By the time the police had arrived to investigate the killing, the new player had turned the $600 into $2,200 in winnings. The police demanded the original $600 to pass on to Fallon’s next of kin – only to discover that the new player turned out to be Fallon’s son, who had not seen his father in seven years!

13. Twin Deaths
In 2002, Seventy-year-old twin brothers died within hours of one another after separate accidents on the same road in northern Finland. The first of the twins died when he was hit by a lorry while riding his bike in Raahe, 600 kilometres north of the capital, Helsinki. He died just 1.5km from the spot where his brother was killed. “This is simply a historic coincidence. Although the road is a busy one, accidents don’t occur every day,” police officer Marja-Leena Huhtala told Reuters. “It made my hair stand on end when I heard the two were brothers, and identical twins at that. It came to mind that perhaps someone from upstairs had a say in this,” she said.

12. Poe Coincidence
In the 19th century, the famous horror writer, Egdar Allan Poe, wrote a book called ‘The narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym’. It was about four survivors of a shipwreck who were in an open boat for many days before they decided to kill and eat the cabin boy whose name was Richard Parker. Some years later, in 1884, the yawl, Mignonette, foundered, with only four survivors, who were in an open boat for many days. Eventually the three senior members of the crew killed and ate the cabin boy. The name of the cabin boy was Richard Parker.

11. Royal Coincidence
In Monza, Italy, King Umberto I, went to a small restaurant for dinner, accompanied by his aide-de-camp, General Emilio Ponzia- Vaglia. When the owner took King Umberto’s order, the King noticed that he and the restaurant owner were virtual doubles, in face and in build. Both men began discussing the striking resemblance between each other and found many more similarities.

Both men were born on the same day, of the same year, (March 14th, 1844).
Both men had been born in the same town.
Both men married a woman with same name, Margherita.
The restaurateur opened his restaurant on the same day that King Umberto was crowned King of Italy.
On the 29th July 1900, King Umberto was informed that the restaurateur had died that day in a mysterious shooting accident, and as he expressed his regret, an anarchist in the crowd then assassinated him.

10. Falling Baby
In 1930s Detroit, a man named Joseph Figlock was to become an amazing figure in a young (and, apparently, incredibly careless) mother’s life. As Figlock was walking down the street, the mother’s baby fell from a high window onto Figlock. The baby’s fall was broken and Figlock and the baby were unharmed. A year later, the selfsame baby fell from the selfsame window, again falling onto Mr. Figlock as he was passing beneath. Once again, both of them survived the event.

9. Mystery Monk
In 19th century Austria, a near-famous painter named Joseph Aigner attempted suicide on several occasions. During his first attempt to hang himself at the age of 18, a mysterious Capuchin monk interrupted Aigner. And again at age 22, the very same monk prevented him from hanging himself. Eight years later, he was sentenced to the gallows for his political activities. But again, his life was saved by the intervention of the same monk. At age 68, Joseph Aigner finally succeeded in suicide, using a pistol to shoot himself. Not surprisingly, the very same Capuchin monk – a man whose name Aigner never even knew, conducted his funeral ceremony.

8. Photographic Coincidence
A German mother who photographed her infant son in 1914 left the film to be developed at a store in Strasbourg. In those days some film plates were sold individually. World War I broke out and unable to return to Strasbourg, the woman gave up the picture for lost. Two years later she bought a film plate in Frankfurt, over 100 miles away, to take a picture of her newborn daughter. When developed the film turned out to be a double exposure, with the picture of her daughter superimposed on the earlier picture of her son. Through some incredible twist of fate, her original film, never developed, had been mislabeled as unused, and had eventually been resold to her.

7. Book Find
In 1973, actor Anthony Hopkins agreed to appear in “The Girl From Petrovka”, based on a novel by George Feifer. Unable to find a copy of the book anywhere in London, Hopkins was surprised to discover one lying on a bench in a train station. It turned out to be George Feifer’s own annotated (personal) copy, which Feifer had lent to a friend, and which had been stolen from his friend’s car.

6. Twins
The twin brothers, Jim Lewis and Jim Springer, were separated at birth, adopted by different families. Unknown to each other, both families named the boys James. Both James grew up not knowing of the other, yet both sought law-enforcement training both had abilities in mechanical drawing and carpentry, and each had married women named Linda. Both had sons, one of who was named James Alan and the other named James Allan. The twin brothers also divorced their wives and married other women – both named Betty. And they both owned dogs which they named Toy.

5. Revenge Killing
In 1883, Henry Ziegland broke off a relationship with his girlfriend who, out of distress, committed suicide. The girl’s enraged brother hunted down Ziegland and shot him. Believing he had killed Ziegland, the brother then took his own life. In fact, however, Ziegland had not been killed. The bullet had only grazed his face, lodging into a tree. It was a narrow escape. Years later, Ziegland decided to cut down the same tree, which still had the bullet in it. The huge tree seemed so formidable that he decided to blow it up with dynamite. The explosion propelled the bullet into Ziegland’s head, killing him.

4. Golden Scarab
From The Structure and Dynamics of the Psyche: “A young woman I was treating had, at a critical moment, a dream in which she was given a golden scarab. While she was telling me this dream I sat with my back to the closed window. Suddenly I heard a noise behind me, like a gentle tapping. I turned round and saw a flying insect knocking against the windowpane from outside. I opened the window and caught the creature in the air as it flew in. It was the nearest analogy to the golden scarab that one finds in our latitudes, a scarabaeid beetle, the common rose-chafer (Cetonia aurata) which contrary to its usual habits had evidently felt an urge to get into a dark room at this particular moment. I must admit that nothing like it ever happened to me before or since, and that the dream of the patient has remained unique in my experience.” – Carl Jung

3. Taxi
In 1975, while riding a moped in Bermuda, a man was accidentally struck and killed by a taxi. One year later, this man’s brother was killed in the very same way. In fact, he was riding the very same moped. And to stretch the odds even further, the very same taxi driven by the same driver – and even carrying the very same passenger struck him!

2. Hotel Discovery
In 1953, television reporter Irv Kupcinet was in London to cover the coronation of Ellizabeth II. In one of the drawers in his room at the Savoy he found some items that, by their identification, belonged to a man named Harry Hannin. Coincidentally, Harry Hannin – a basketball star with the famed Harlem Globetrotters – was a good friend of Kupcinet’s. But the story has yet another twist. Just two days later, and before he could tell Hannin of his lucky discovery, Kupcinet received a letter from Hannin. In the letter, Hannin told Kucinet that while staying at the Hotel Meurice in Paris, he found in a drawer a tie – with Kupcinet’s name on it.

1. Historical Coincidence
The lives of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, two of America’s founders. Jefferson crafted the Declaration of Independence, showing drafts of it to Adams, who (with Benjamin Franklin) helped to edit and hone it. The Continental Congress approved the document on July 4, 1776. Surprisingly, both Jefferson and Adams died on the same day, July 4, 1826 – exactly 50 years from the signing of the Declaration of Independence.